Servicing Guide: 2011 Hyundai Sonata

The 2011 Hyundai Sonata uses the new Hyundai high-security four-track lock system. All Hyundai high-security lock systems are based on the older Lexus system. The Hyundai system has 12 cuts, with six cuts located on each side of the key. All of the...


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The 2011 Hyundai Sonata uses the new Hyundai high-security four-track lock system. All Hyundai high-security lock systems are based on the older Lexus system. The Hyundai system has 12 cuts, with six cuts located on each side of the key. All of the tumblers are “split tumblers” with six separate tumblers riding on each side of the key. A mechanical key for all of these lock systems can be made on the Ilco LXP90 key blank.

 

Unlocking the Sonata

Like most new vehicles, the 2011 Sonata uses bicycle-style cables inside the doors, eliminating the possibility of using a tool that goes inside the door cavity to unlock the car. A long-reach tool such as the “Jiffy-Jak Vehicle Entry System” can also be used on the Sonata, but I prefer to use an under-the-window style tool such as the Tech-Train 1025. The fit at the base of the window on the Sonata is not nearly as tight as on a lot of other cars so it’s relatively easy to get an under-window tool in and out.

I use two wedges inserted about 10 inches apart, and centered above the inside door handle in order to make room to insert the tool. Because of the multi-layer weather stripping, I always insert a plastic shim between the glass and the weather stripping before I insert the wedges. The shim will prevent the wedge from rolling the lower layer of the weather stripping under as you insert it. Once the wedge is in place, the shim can be removed.

I use the shim once again as I insert the tool, so that it also doesn’t roll the lower layer of the weather stripping under. If you allow the weather stripping to roll under the wedge or the tool, it will make it harder to move the tool once you insert it into the door, and it may even damage the weather stripping.

When the top bend of the tool is below the bottom edge of the glass, stop and remove the wedges. This will make it easier to manipulate the tool in the door, and it will reduce the stress on the glass. If you don’t remove the wedges, you run a risk of breaking the glass. In addition, if the vehicle is equipped with after-market tint film on the window, you are much more likely to damage the film if you don’t remove the wedges.

Once the tool is free to move inside the passenger compartment, bring the tip of the tool down to the inside lock control rocker. Use leverage against the handle end of the tool to flip the rocker to the rear and unlock the door. Once the door is unlocked, using the shim again on the inside of the door will help protect the inside weather stripping, and make it easier to remove the tool from the door.

 

Door Lock

The door lock is the easiest lock on the car to remove and it also has all of the tumblers in order make a key that will work the entire car. The lock is held in place with a single 8mm bolt concealed behind a plastic plug on the edge of the door.

Unlike many vehicles, the bolt that holds the door lock in place is not captive and will come completely free of the door. Do not drop it inside the door as you remove it. A magnetic insert in your socket or nut-driver will keep the bolt from falling.

After the retaining bolt has been removed, the lock will pull out of the door. You may have to pull the handle slightly in order to free up the lock. There is no code on the door lock, but it can be decoded easily.

Once the lock is free of the door, take it into your shop or truck to decode it. The lock assembly consists of the lock, tailpiece, and a plastic shell that matches the paint color. Use caution as you work on the lock to avoid scratching the plastic shell.

A large drain hole on the underside of the lock will allow you to sight-read ten of the 12 wafer tumblers. If you have a set of depth keys, sometimes referred to as “guide keys,” for this lock system, you can insert them one at a time to help you sight-read the depths of the cuts. After you have decoded the cuts that you can see, use a fill program or progression to determine the remaining two cuts.

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