Locksmithing etc. November 2011

Removing Shear Head Bolts

Removing the ignition switch with mechanical lock from Honda, Toyotas, etc. requires removing the two shear head bolts. They are called shear head bolts because the shank portion of the bolt is narrowed just above the enlarged section that secures the horseshoe clamp onto the switch body. The shear head bolts have a standard octagonal bolt head that is used to thread and secure the lower portion of the bolt. Once sufficient torque is exerted against the bolt to tighten it in place, the bolt head shears off.

To remove the shear head bolts in order to remove the ignition switch with lock, the non-head portions have to be removed.

There are two common ways to remove them - using a pointed punch and heavy hammer to loosen them or grind a slot into the top and uses an impact wrench with a straight slot driver to unscrew them.

No matter which method you use, take care not to damage the dashboard or the instrument panel.

Note: Sometimes loosening the steering column mounting screws can provide a bit more room.

 

Price Increases

With the cost of raw materials continuing to go up, the price increases are continuing. Some companies are raising their prices across the board and others are targeting specific products. I have heard of a 5 percent and higher price increases.

It is a good idea to get a price for the remainder of a day before you give your customer a quote. Explain that prices are jumping and if you could get an answer the same day, you can guarantee the price.

 

Powerful Pliers

I do not know if this is true, but I was told that the person who demonstrated the Snap-on Talon Grip™ combination slip-joint pliers was able to lift a penny not by grabbing the edge, but by grabbing the stamping of Abraham Lincoln. According to the advertisement, the diamond tip serrations offer up to 58 percent more pulling power.

For more information contact, Snap-on at Web Site: www.snapon.com

 

New From DynaLock

DynaLock has introduced the 1400 Series Dual Voltage Cabinet Locks and the 7500 Series Standalone Digital Keypad. The stainless steel locking pin cabinet locks are rated for 440 lbs. holding force. The self-adjusting catch assembly locks can be installed into cabinet or drawer applications. These 12 or 24 VDC field-selectable, Fail-Safe or Fail-Secure cabinet locks require 200mA @12VDC or 100mA @ 24VDC.

The Dynalock 7500 Series proximity card reader/digital keypad is designed to operate as a single or two door access controller. This single or dual credential reader can accommodate up to five hundred users. Power requirements are 12-24VDC or 16-24VAC. The backlit metal keypad is weather and vandal resistant. The 7500 Series has two - 2 Amp rated SPDT (Single Pole Double Throw) relay outputs, and a REX and Auxiliary inputs. A built-in heater automatically activates at 4° Fahrenheit to prevent freezing.

For more information, contact your local locksmith distributor or Dynalock at Web Site: www.dynalock.com

 

Ilco RW4 Plus/EZ®-Clone Plus

Kaba Ilco has a software update for the RW4 Plus and Ilco EZ®-Clone Plus Cloning Devices. The free software update, version 02.00.056, enables these devices to clone Philips (ID46) transponders on many vehicles when only one LED illuminates on the Snoop during the cloning process. Previously, all Phillips transponder based engine immobilizer systems required two illuminated LED’s to successfully clone.

According to Ilco, “It is still recommended to turn the key in the ignition several times to attempt to receive 2 illuminated LED’s on the Snoop. At this point, if only one LED is illuminated, please proceed with the cloning process with the RW4 Plus or EZ Clone Plus.” A partial list of the vehicle requiring only one LED is available, see Technical Bulletin TB-02-11. See the web site: http://www.kaba-ilco.com/key_systems/literature/literature_grid_automotive.aspx?id=57

For the free software update, contact Kaba Ilco Customer Service at 800-334-3321(option 1) or e-mail: info@irm.kaba.com

 

CodeLocks CL6000 Series

CodeLocks has introduced the CL6000 Series, a standalone battery power electronic lockset equipped with a 12-button keypad. The CL6000 meets or exceeds the ANSI/BHMA A156.2-2003 and A156.25-2007 Grade 1 standards. ANSI/BMHA A156.2 is the American National Standard for Bored and Preassembled Locks and Latches. ANSI/BMHA A156.25 is the Standard for Electrified Locking Systems.

CL6000 locks are programmed at the door, having up to 80 four- to six-digit User Codes and up to 10 one-time User Codes. According to CodeLocks, the CL6000 Series will have over 200,000 operations on a set of four AA batteries.

The CL6000 Series are equipped with non-handed, ADA compliant levers. This electronic lockset is UL / ULC Listed having a 3 hour fire rating.

For more information, contact your local locksmith distributor or CodeLocks Inc., 2930-B College Ave, Costa Mesa, CA 92626. Telephone: 714-979-2900. Website: www.codelocks.us.

 

Controlling Costs

Contact your insurance company for a review of the services you pay for. See if they can offer you a lower rate. If not, contact other companies that are AAA rated for a quote. For example, workers compensation is expensive. I was told that ADP in addition to offering check services offers workers compensation insurance.

 

Major Mfg HIT-66 Update

Major Manufacturing has introduced five templates for their HIT-66 clamp system using the HIT-4509 mortise alignment plate. Each template set includes outside and inside templates have hardened drill bushings. There is drill information machined into the anodized aluminum.

The five templates and their applications are:

HIT-66-240 Template: Falcon MA Series Mortise Locks

HIT-66-250 Template: Kaba E-Plex 5000 Series Mortise Locks

HIT-66-251 Template: Kaba 660/760/770/790 Series Mortise Locks

HIT-66-263 Template: Onity CT Series Mortise Locks

HIT-66-264 Template: Onity HT Series Mortise Locks

The HIT-66 clamp system is designed for wood and steel doors 1-1/4” to 2-7/8” thick.

For more information, contact your local locksmith distributor or Major Manufacturing, 1825 Via Burton, Anaheim, CA 92806 Telephone 714-772-5202 Web Site: www.majormfg.com

 

Car-Opening Techniques: 2006-up Volkswagen Passat

This month we will offer recommended car-opening techniques for the 2006-up Volkswagen Passat. The door locking mechanism is a hybrid electronic, there is no inside mechanical linkage in these vehicles.

Warning: This vehicle is equipped with multi-layer weather stripping at the base of the windows. The windows are extremely tight. Use extreme care as the slightest scrape may result in the window glass breaking.

Warning: Failure to remove the wedges at the time when the tool manufacturers recommend can cause window glass to break.

The following opening methods can be used to unlock the Volkswagen Passat:

Use the High Tech Tools Long Inside Access 89 Tool to unlock the front passenger door locking mechanism. Separate the glass from the weather strip by positioning a wedge at the rear edge of the inside lock control handle. Insert the Inside Access Tool with the working end pointing towards the front. Reposition the wedge to allow lowering the tool into the door until the shaped portion of the tool is beneath the bottom of the window glass. Rotate the tool clockwise until the shaped portion of the tool is on the passenger compartment side of the window glass. Carefully lift the tool until the working end is within the passenger compartment. Position the working end of the tool in front of the door lock button. Manipulate the door lock button towards the front of the vehicle to unlock the locking mechanism. See car opening instructions for removal of the tool.

 

Use the Pro-Lok AO35 “MCOT-Wide” tool and an inflatable wedge to unlock the rear passenger door locking mechanism. Begin by inserting the inflatable wedge 10 inches from the rear edge of the front passenger door window. Inflate the wedge according to manufacturer’s instructions.

Insert the AO33 “MCOT Separator Tool 2 inches from the front edge of the window with the tip facing rearward. Insert the AO35 car-opening tool into the door eight inches from the front edge of the window with the tip facing forward. Lower both tools fourteen inches into the door cavity. Rotate both tools until the working portion is on the passenger compartment side of the window glass. Deflate the wedge. Carefully lift the AO33 tool until the tip is in the passenger compartment. Lift the AO35 tool into the passenger compartment using the gap created by the AO33 tool. Rotate the AO35 tool 45 degrees counterclockwise and manipulate the tip of the tool onto the top portion of the electric lock-unlock button. Carefully push the button, unlocking the locking mechanism. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for removing the car-opening tool.

 

Use the Slide Lock Flush Mount Tool™ to unlock the front passenger’s door locking mechanism. Begin by judging the distance the tool has to be lowered into the front passenger door for the loop to be beneath the bottom of the window glass. Insert the two wedges slightly larger than the width of the Flush Mount Tool in front of the outside door handle. Lubricate the top of the loop to make entry into the passenger compartment easier. Carefully insert the Flush Mount Tool into the opening between the two wedges. Lower the tool into the door cavity until the top of the loop is beneath the window glass. Rotate the tool until the loop is on the passenger side of the window glass. Carefully raise the tool until the loop slides up on the interior side of the window glass. As soon as the tool is just visible, stop and remove the wedges. Carefully continue to raise the car opening tool until the tip is in the passenger compartment. Position the tip of the tool against the inside lock unlock control. Carefully manipulate the tool to unlock the locking mechanism avoiding scratching the plastic components. Carefully remove the tool according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

 

Use the Tech-Train Productions TT-1036 to unlock the front passenger’s door locking mechanism. The opening tool and two wedges to unlock the front passenger door locking mechanism. Begin by inserting two wedges above the inside door handle. Carefully insert the TT-1036 car-opening tool into the door cavity with the hooked end facing forward. Carefully lower the tool until the bend of the tool is beneath the bottom of the window glass. Rotate the tool inboard slightly and raise the tool slowly and carefully. The moment the tool bend can be seen within the passenger compartment, stop and remove the wedges. After the wedges have been removed, raise the tool until the tip is within the passenger compartment. Manipulate the tool until the tip is behind the inside door handle. Pull out on the handle as far as it can go and then allow it to return to the rest position. This unlocks the door locking mechanism. Pull on the outside door handle and open the door. Carefully remove the tool according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

The direction to rotate the late model Volkswagen Passat’s driver’s door lock plug to the unlocked position is counterclockwise. There is no key lock on the front passenger door.

 

For more information, contact your local locksmith distributor or the following car-opening tool manufacturers.

High Tech Tools, 1628 NW 28th St., Miami, FL 33142. Telephone: 1-800-323-8324, Fax: 305-635-1015. Website: www.hightechtools.com.

Pro-Lok, 655 North Hariton Street, Orange, CA 92868. Telephone: 714-633-0681. Fax: 714-633-0470. Website: www.pro-lok.com.

Slide Lock Tool Co. Inc., 1166 Topside Rd., Louisville, TN 37777. Telephone: 800-336-8812. Website: www.z-tool.com.

Lockmasters Inc. (Tech-Train products), 2101 John C. Watts Drive, Nicholasville, KY 40356. Telephone: 800-654-0637. Fax: 859-885-7093. Website: www.lockmasters.com.

We are interested in printing opening methods from other car-opening tool manufacturers. To have your instructions published, contact Jerry Levine C/O Locksmith Ledger 3030 Salt Creek Lane, Suite 200, Arlington Heights, IL 60005. Fax: 847-454-2759. E-mail: jerry.levine@cygnus.com.

Loading