What’s New in Vehicle Entry?

Vehicle Entry isn’t what it used to be. I’ve been making a living from selling vehicle entry tools and information for more than 20 years now, and I’m beginning to wish I had picked a field that was easier to keep up with. When I started, it was all...


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The reason that the Flip-Pick does not work on VW / Audi / Porsche locks made from 2004 and up is that VW changed the way the tumblers are positioned inside the lock in an effort to improve pick resistance. Fortunately for us, there is now another pick that will pick not just the newer VWs, but also the older ones as well. I have had nearly a 100 percent success rate with the VWEZ pick shown in photo 8. I like this little pick so much that I have actually given them to locksmith friends as gifts!

A variation on the VWEZ pick is the BMWEZ pick. (photo 9) While I have not had nearly as much luck with this pick on BMWs as I have had with the VWEZ, it is nearly 100 percent effective on Mini-Coopers, which use a variation of the BMW 2-track lock. I’ve got about a 60 percent success rate on actual BMW 2-track locks with this tool.

A few years ago, I started hearing about a new line of picks coming from overseas called Lishi Picks. I tried some of the early versions of these picks with mixed results. In the case of the 2-track BMW locks, I found that I could usually pick the lock easier with the Flip-Pick, but that sometimes, I could pick a lock with the Lishi pick that I couldn’t pick with the Flip-Pick.

Recently, Lishi has introduced a line of “2-in-1” picks that not only pick the locks much more consistently than the earlier picks, but also decodes the lock after it has been picked. I have not yet had the opportunity to try all of these picks in the field, but so far, on the ones that I have tried, I have had great success.

The 2-in-1 pick sets fall into three general categories: 2-track picks, 4-track picks and picks for traditional non-sidebar automotive locks. One example of each type is listed below.

The HU100 2-in-1 pick (photo 10) is used on the new GM vehicles that use high-security locks such as the Camaro, Lacrosse, Terrain, Equinox, Cruze and Volt. Once the tool is inserted into the lock, the two levers allow you to pick each tumbler individually until the lock turns. After the lock has been picked, the same levers will allow you to decode the lock without removing it from the door. Similar Lishi picks are available for the new Ford system, VW, BMW 2-Track, and many others.

The HON66 2-in-1 Pick set (photo 11) will allow you to pick and decode the door locks on all late-models Honda and Acura vehicles. This tool is not as easy to use as the 2-track pick sets because of the construction of the locks. The Honda 4-track system has split tumblers in most positions to make picking more difficult. With any split-tumbler system you will essentially have to pick the lock three times.

The first time you pick it, it will turn slightly until the split tumblers from one side of the lock engage in the chambers from the opposite side. This will cause the lock to hang up in a slightly turned position. At that point, you will have to pick the tumblers that are hung a second time. Fortunately, only a few of the tumblers will be hung and it is relatively easy to pick the lock the rest of the way, which will allow the lock to turn completely. Once the lock has been turned, the vehicle will be unlocked and you can use the tool to decode the lock if you wish. Then, you will have to turn the lock back, but then it will once again hang up with some of the tumblers engaged in the wrong chambers. Picking it back to the rest position involves once again picking the few tumblers that are hung, and then you can remove the pick.

Similar Lishi picks are available for other 4-track systems that use split-tumblers such as the Lexus long and the Lexus short systems. All of the locks with split-tumblers will require the three step picking process.

The new Lishi Ford 8-cut pick set (photo 12) is simply a joy to use. This pick set makes picking 8-cut Ford locks a walk in the park. By using the same picking system that Lishi uses on the high-security locks, this pick for a traditional lock is so easy to use, it’s scary. Once the lock has been picked, you can also decode the cuts and make a key just as easily. One nice thing about this system is that it also works on the oddball locks that are used on the Focus and the Escape, which are difficult to decode with many other types of decoders.

The biggest problem with the Lishi picks is that they don’t come with instructions. To deal with that, Lishi has recently published a user’s guide (photo 13) that not only explains to pick some of the most sophisticated locks in the world, but also how to decode them with the Lishi tools.

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