Conversion: Rim Exit to Yale 7160 Concealed Vertical Rod Exit Device

I was invited to the retrofitting of the lock hardware on a pair of wide stile aluminum doors equipped with rim exit devices latching onto a mullion.


I was invited to the retrofitting of the lock hardware on a pair of wide stile aluminum doors equipped with rim exit devices latching onto a mullion. To improve traffic flow, a decision was made to remove the mullion from this opening. In order to remove the mullion, the exit devices were changed...


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I was invited to the retrofitting of the lock hardware on a pair of wide stile aluminum doors equipped with rim exit devices latching onto a mullion. To improve traffic flow, a decision was made to remove the mullion from this opening. In order to remove the mullion, the exit devices were changed out to vertical rod type. Because this is a public building, for safety and longevity, the Yale 7160 Concealed Vertical Rod Exit Device using the Yale 626F Trim was installed.

The Yale 7160 Concealed Vertical Rod Exit Device is equipped with a steel case. The Yale 7160 is designed for minimum 4-1/2" wide stile doors. These handed, field-reversible exit devices can be used on wood and metal doors. To secure the door, the concealed top latch enters a mortised top strike. For this application, the 7160 exit device was ordered less bottom rod. The Yale 7160 is ANSI A156.3 Type 7 and 8, Grade 1, UL/cUL Listed FVSR/FVSR7 for panic hardware. For fire exit device less bottom rod applications, a heat-activated door bolt (Popper) is required.

The 626F Trim is equipped with patented free-wheeling levers. This clutch mechanism allows the outside trim lever to float down 60 degrees when in the locked condition. For vandal and attack resistance, this heavy-duty solid forged escutcheon trim is through-bolted with threaded studs. To resist frontal attack, the escutcheon has beveled sides. When equipped with a 1-1/8" rim cylinder, a collar is required. The Yale 626F trim is available with eight lever designs. For this installation, the Yale 626F trim was classroom function requiring an operating key to unlock or lock the lever to control access.

To retrofit from rim to concealed vertical rod exit devices, several modifications were necessary. Each of the concealed latch mechanisms required a pair of mounting blocks placed into the stiles. In addition, the lock side of each stile had to be modified to accommodate the opening for the yoke pin and the 626F trim.

For this retrofit, the locksmiths had to make four mounting blocks for the two top latches, and modify four stainless steel Mag plates to accommodate the device and trim. The Mag plates will be placed onto both side of the door. They performed two functions. The first plate was the template for the openings required by the exit device and trim. The second covered the holes used to mount the rim exit devices.

The doors had to be removed from the jambs in order to modify the stile and install the mounting blocks. In this specific installation, there was sufficient space between the door and jamb, enabling the top pivot arm to be unscrewed and removed from the header in order to remove the door.

IMPORTANT: We strongly recommend at least two people perform the door removal and installation.

Before removing the door, check the operation of the floor closer. If the closer is adjustable, make any necessary adjustments for the door to properly close. If the floor closer is not operational, service as needed since the door must be removed in order to access the closer.

To retrofit the doors with the Yale Concealed Vertical Rod Exit Devices:

Step 1. Loosen the floor closer shaft retaining bolt. A spray of Liquid Wrench can make loosening the bolt and removing the door easier.

Step 2. Remove the screws from the jamb side of the center pivot.

Step 3. Remove the screws from the jamb side of the top pivot.

Step 4. Raise the door slightly in order to remove any shim washers from the closer shaft. Removing the washers enlarges the gap between the overall door height and the jamb height, making it easier to remove the door. Lower the door.

Step 5. Carefully slide the top pivot arm from the header.

Step 6. Slightly tilt the door out from the jamb. The farther the door tilts out from the jamb, the more resistance there is to lifting the door off the closer shaft. However, the door must be tilted out to be removed from the jamb. Use a crow bar to slowly lift the door as it is tilted away from the jamb.

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