Herald Datanetics Limited

This lock uses the touch of a registered fingerprint to unlock the door.


Whenever a new type of security device is introduced, it takes time for that type of device to be generally accepted into the market. Biometric devices have been around in various forms for at least two decades. Hand geometry readers, face and voice recognition systems and retina scanners have all...


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Whenever a new type of security device is introduced, it takes time for that type of device to be generally accepted into the market. Biometric devices have been around in various forms for at least two decades. Hand geometry readers, face and voice recognition systems and retina scanners have all had limited success in the commercial security marketplace.

Part of the resistance may be because of fear of the unknown by the end user. Some people are afraid that the electronic device may cause them bodily harm. According to Alfred Lee, manager at Herald Datanetics Ltd., “Consumers are still trying to understand this biometric technology. Once they have more knowledge they will trust this technology more.”

One biometric device that has been readily accepted is the fingerprint reader. In fact, fingerprint access systems account for roughly 50 percent of the biometric access control market. Fingerprints are stored in a database and compared to the user requesting entry.

Herald Datanetics Limited has recently introduced a line of biometric fingerprint devices including stand-alone units and those that can be integrated into a smartcard, wiegand, magnetic stripe card, PIN code or time recording system.

The HFD112S Fingerprint Door Lock is designed for use in small office settings. Unlike a conventional keyed lock, it uses the touch of a registered fingerprint to unlock the door. Users do not need to remember any passwords or PIN codes. (Photo 1)

FEATURES

  • Non-volatile memory for fingerprint template storage.
  • Tubular latch design for use in standard door prep.
  • Integrated die-cast lock housing and handle provide vandal resistance.
  • Covered tubular cam lock provides emergency key override.
  • Constructed of solid zinc alloy materials.
  • Fingerprints are encrypted to templates for memory.
  • For privacy, templates cannot be converted back to fingerprint image

Stores up to 105 fingerprint templates (100 user/5 master).

The HFD112S operates using four AA alkaline batteries and has low power consumption. An external DC power supply is an option. A low battery indicator is included and the unit has good weather resistance for outdoor applications with an operating range of minus 20 degrees Celsius (–4F) to plus 50 degrees Celsius (122F).

Standard finishes available are Satin Nickel, Satin Chrome, Satin Gold, Antique Bronze and Polished Brass.

INSTALLATION

The lock will easily install into an existing 2-1/8” cross-bore opening. For a new installation, a 1-1/4” cross-bore opening will suffice. The lock has a standard 2-3/4” backset. Two additional three-quarter-inch holes are required for the bottom throughbolt and cable pass through.

Two half-inch holes are drilled for the upper through bolts. The template supplied with the lock can also be downloaded. The latch faceplate uses a 1” by 2-1/4” cutout.

After all holes are drilled per the template, insert the latch unit into position. For outdoor applications, the manufacturer recommends using a silicone weather seal to prevent moisture incursion. Before using silicone sealant, dry fit the components and make sure the lock properly operates.

Feed the connecting cables through the upper cable hole. Align the three extended mounting posts with the holes to hold the front case in position. (Photo 2)

Select the proper transmission shaft based on door thickness and orientation (LH or RH) per the instructions. Feed the shaft through the latch unit and into the lever of the front case. (Photo 3)

Use the large spanner wrench to loosen the holding nut of the inner door lever and remove the battery cover from the back case. Remove the cosmetic screw from the lower portion of the back case.

Match the 9-pin and 10-pin connectors to their respective cables and seat them into position. (Photo 4)

Align the back case with the transmission shaft and three mounting holes. Install three mounting screws to secure the front and back cases together. (Photo 5) Use the large spanner wrench to tighten the inner lever holding nut. (Photo 6)

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