Video Trends for Locksmiths

Shipped in a single box with the camera and lens already mounted in the enclosure, “plug-and-play” packages from a single manufacturer simplify installation as well as the ordering process.   Although once expensive and considered only for...


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It could be argued that any system using a hard-wired connection, such as coaxial cable, unshielded twisted pair topper conductor, or fiber-optic cabling to connect cameras to head-end equipment, is an analog system. Therefore, because the majority of video surveillance systems currently in use rely on a hard-wired connection for the transmission of video signals, they are still considered analog, regardless of individual components that use some form of digital technology.

 

A digital system uses network based Internet Protocol (IP) components for the transmission of all-digital, 8-bit ( or higher) video signals at a wavelength of 1,310 nanometers from digital IP cameras with built-in Ethernet interface over a network to a digital video recorder or network video recorder.(NVR).

 

What's next? Multi-pixel cameras are already here, and growing in use. They enable larger fields of view without sacrificing image quality; that is to say, they are capable of achieving what is considered acceptable image qualities. Processors allow the system user to crop and zoom to a specific region of the total camera view. This technique along with on camera recording capabilities and image motion detectors which stretch image storage capacities and conserve network bandwidth, are generally regarded as the trends of the future in video surveillance.

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