Airport Security Opportunities

For every huge airport like O’Hare and LAX, there are hundreds of smaller airports that don’t have the flight activity or personnel budget to have a full-time locksmith on staff. This is where you come in.


The increase in security at airports since Sept. 11, 2001, has been obvious. The large metropolitan airports are crawling with additional personnel, equipment and activity. These large airports have security staffs that usually involve in-house locksmiths to install and service the security...


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The increase in security at airports since Sept. 11, 2001, has been obvious. The large metropolitan airports are crawling with additional personnel, equipment and activity. These large airports have security staffs that usually involve in-house locksmiths to install and service the security products.

SALES OPPORTUNITIES
In addition to the overwhelming list of items required by the Transportation Safety Administration and the Federal Aviation Authority, there are local and regional codes to be met.
Because the nature of security and needs are constantly changing, there is an ongoing effort to keep abreast of these changes. Let’s look at the potential for selling security products to different areas of an airport and what their needs might include.

The perimeter doors to both the general public and secured areas have the potential for upgraded key control or high security cylinders. Discuss the matter with the security people and explain how key control can benefit them when an employee leaves. The liability of an ex-employee gaining access to a secured area is lessened when a restricted key is returned upon their departure. Maintaining key control is vital to the security of an airport.
Although many smaller airports don’t use enclosed jetways to get on and off the airplane, there are still doors, stairways, sections and areas that are off-limits.

Restricted areas offer an opportunity to upgrade mechanical locks to electronic push button locks. These standalone units can provide an excellent way to provide full time zone control and the ability to grant and deny access to personnel without rekeying. The audit trail feature allows reporting of who used which lock and when they used it. Some models even track unauthorized attempts at entry by an authorized user.

Credentials for electronic locks can be in the form of mag stripe, proximity or Weigand cards. The best upgrade now includes cards with dual features. One card can be used for proximity and mag stripe use. These cards are normally also used as personnel identification badges and may allow employees to purchase food and other items as well. Ibuttons, Dallas chips, proximity key fobs and electronic smart keys are also items that can offer additional security to your customer. 

Although the X-Ray machines and hand-held scanners are out of our area, there are numerous other areas at airport that require the products you sell. Various gates and storage areas use padlocks, cam locks, cabinet locks and utility locks. You have the ability to offer some or all of these locks that will be compatible with their master key system, but your customer may not know these products exist unless you tell them.
Other restricted areas of an airport include baggage areas, equipment storage areas, hangars, maintenance shops etc. Combine these with gift shops, food vendors, airline counters and the airline areas themselves and you have a long list of potential sales opportunities that you may be missing now.

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