Quick Reference Guide: Pontiac Grand Prix

The transponder programming for the Grand Prix is a little odd, so you need to pay particular attention to the section in this article on programming.


The latest version of the Pontiac Grand Prix (Photo 1) was introduced in 2004, as one of the early GM vehicles equipped with the Z-Keyway. From 2004 until 2007, all of these vehicles were equipped with Ortech locks using the Z-Keyway and the PK3 transponder system. In the 2008 model year the...


To access the remainder of this piece of premium content, you must be registered with Locksmith Ledger. Already have an account? Login

Register in seconds by connecting with your preferred Social Network.

OR

Complete the registration form.

Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Optional
Required
Required

The latest version of the Pontiac Grand Prix (Photo 1) was introduced in 2004, as one of the early GM vehicles equipped with the Z-Keyway. From 2004 until 2007, all of these vehicles were equipped with Ortech locks using the Z-Keyway and the PK3 transponder system. In the 2008 model year the locks remained essentially the same, but the transponder system changed to the “Circle Plus” system.

Another oddity about the Grand Prix is the deck lock. Only the 2004 Grand Prix was equipped with a trunk lock. Beginning with the 2005 model year, the trunk lock was eliminated. The transponder programming for the Grand Prix is also a little odd, and you need to pay particular attention to the section in this article on programming.

CAR OPENING
Use the long end of the Tech-Train 1008 tool to unlock the Grand Prix. The fit of the weatherstripping at the base of the window is so tight that it is actually easier to insert the tool without a wedge. I use a plastic shim to hold the lower layers of the weatherstripping out of the way as I insert the tool. The shim is inserted at the extreme rear corner of the door.

Before inserting the tool into the door, I place the tool against the outside of the door and measure the distance from the top of the weatherstripping to the top of the trim strip on the door. This is the depth that I want to lower the tool into the door. You can either put a mark on the shaft of your tool, or hold your fingers on the tool at the depth you need to go as you insert the tool.

Gently work the long end of the tool between the shim and the glass. Once the tip of the tool is free inside the door, lower it to the point that you measured off earlier. While keeping the shaft of the tool vertical, rotate the tip of the tool that is inside the door as far as it will go toward the inside of the vehicle. When the tool stops, it should be against the side of the vertical linkage rod.

While watching the inside lock button for movement, pull up on the tool to unlock the door. If the tool slips off, re-position the tool and try again while twisting the tool so that the tip of the tool is pressed harder against the linkage rod.

With the door panel removed, we can see how the tool contacts the linkage rod. (See Photo 4) If you have lowered the tool to the proper depth inside the door, the hooked end of the tool should be held firmly against the linkage rod. Pulling up on the tool while you hold pressure against the linkage rod will lift the linkage and unlock the door.

This content continues onto the next page...

We Recommend