Stand Alone Access Control Solutions From Securitron and Essex

The Securitron DK-26 is Securiton’s medium to high security keypad solution. The narrow keypad makes this system suitable for door frames with narrow frames. The basic system is comprised of a controller which mounts inside the protected area, and...


The Securitron DK-26 is Securiton’s medium to high security keypad solution. The narrow keypad makes this system suitable for door frames with narrow frames.

The basic system is comprised of a controller which mounts inside the protected area, and the keypad which mounts on the outside of the protected area. The keypad is supplied with a 16-foot cable, which can be extended in the field up to the factory suggested 100 feet as required.

And additional keypad may be wired to the controller to add exit control to the system. (An expander module DK-XP adds 60 more users to the 59 user capacity of the basic product; as well the ability to print out activity reports to a serial printer.)

The unit requires 12-24 Volts AC or DC. The unit draws 160 ma @12 Volts or 190 ma @ 24 Volts.

Be sure to provide adequate power if you plan to operate the electric lock from the same power supply to avoid voltage drops which could impair performance. This is true whenever a power supply is used to power both the controller and the locking device.

If a single AC power source is going to be used, the DK-26 provides a DC Tap Output which supplies up to 2 amps of DC for the use with the locking device.

Whether you use a separate power supply for the locking device or not, for additional protection to the DK-26, a MOV is supplied with the DK-26 which attaches across the relay terminals. MOVs are Metal Oxide Varisters which suppress surges and arcing, thereby enhancing system performance and prolonging the life of the switch contacts.

The output relay is DPDT (2 Form “C”) and may be used with fail-safe, fail-secure locks or delayed egress locks such as Securitron’s IMXDa. The output relay contacts are rated at 5 Amps.

The cast stainless steel keypad is equipped with11 EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer) rubber keys, is weatherproof and vandal resistant and mounts on any surface including a narrow mullion.

Each button is an individual switch, so the DK-26 offers true 10-digit operation (keys are not paired).

The DK-26 is also available with a Wiegand output so that the PIN codes can be sent to external equipment. The DK 26W does not provide relay outputs or any other of the features of the DK-26, just a Weigand output.

The DK 26 offers what is referred to as a ‘Hard Code’ as well as fixed code programming.

Employ fixed programming in a situation where the end user is not likely to ever change the code, or at least that changes would be rare. Fixed programming can be used in lower security “traffic control” applications, as the longer the code remains unchanged, the greater the risk that an unauthorized person will be able to learn it.

The DK-26 makes it simple for you to program the unit in this “fixed” way. You will utilize a push button set, single code called the “Hard Code.” To delete the Hard code, press the “Hard Code” button on the CPU board, confirm that you are in hard program mode (slow yellow flash) and press the Bell key or wait 30 seconds.

Keypad Changeable Code Programming: In this application, two codes are programmed into the DK-26. The first, called the Program Code, acts as a password which allows changing the User code.

Thee User code is employed regularly to gain access. Knowledge of the Program code should be restricted to security management as its only use is to change the User code. With this method of operation, higher security is obtained because the end user can change the User code regularly or any time he feels it has been compromised.

This is the day to day procedure that should be taught to the end user.

Adding Multiple User Codes: The DK-26 has memory locations for up to 59 User codes. This allows separate codes for individuals or groups which is a benefit because when one code is changed (usually owing to a security worry), the people who use the other codes don’t have to learn a new code.

Test all the codes before you consider programming complete.

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