HASPS –The Closing Mechanism for Padlocks

People have been locking up their possessions forever. To secure possessions, there are specialized locks like door locks, vehicle locks and utility locks. These types of locks provide specific functions. They are not designed to be taken off and used for...


People have been locking up their possessions forever. To secure possessions, there are specialized locks like door locks, vehicle locks and utility locks. These types of locks provide specific functions. They are not designed to be taken off and used for a different application.

Then there is the much used and abused padlock, the workhorse for securing all types of property including as a secondary locking mechanism for file cabinets. Padlocks were and still are used to lock doors for different kinds of buildings and a significant number of garage doors. In today’s economy, I have seen a few homes front doors “padlocked” shut. Some school and gym lockers are still secured by combination padlocks. They are used to keep toolboxes of varying sizes closed.

However, the padlock is only part of the locking mechanism. The closing mechanism, a hasp, is necessary for the padlock to secure the object. The basic hasp is a hinged metal fastener with a slotted end that fits over a separate fixed staple. The hinged portion of the hasp contains mounting holes for the screws. The padlock locks the closed hasp by sliding its shackle through the exposed staple, trapping the fastener. The mounting screws for the fastener and the staple are concealed when the hasp is in the closed position.

There are many different types and styles of hasps. In this article we will discuss the basic hasp and the special application hasps. For aesthetics, Phoenix Lock Company manufactures two styles cast solid brass safety hasps that are available in burnished brass, polished chrome and polished brass.

Hasps are manufactured of varying thickness and materials. The staple of a commercial grade hasp is normally a bent rod of hardened steel or other alloy that resists cutting or sawing. Sometimes the manufacturer will also harden the fastener near the staple opening. Some hasp manufacturers offer swivel staple hasps where the staple can rotate further restricting the opening. Lightweight hasps are designed for honest persons keeping things safe within the confines of their residence or garages. To add some strength, some hasp manufacturers rib the fastener. Most ferrous metal hasps are plated to protect against corrosion.

The combination padlock built onto a hasp is one of the variations. This “hasplock” has been around for many years. They are still available from Master Lock having a 1-3/4” laminated body warded padlock. They are also available with pin tumbler locks.

Over the years, the types and designs of the hasp have been modified to accommodate specific needs. The most common modification is the introduction of the heavy duty hasps. Heavy duty hasps are designed to resist being forcibly opened or removed. They are manufactured of hardened metals including steel and other metallic alloys to resist hammering, sawing cutting and other method of force.

For example, Abus has heavy duty hasps manufactured of white heart malleable iron, with a lower silicon content. This results in an alloy with good hardness and abrasion resistance. A hardened steel staple completes the hasp.

A variation of the heavy-duty hasp is making use of a larger staple. The large staple covers more of the exposed portion of the shackle, reducing the ability to cut or break the shackle. Some padlocks are specifically designed to operate in conjunction with this type of hasp.

From the straight hasp designed for flat surfaces comes the right-angle hasps where the fastener is bent 90 degrees and slides over the staple. Right-angle hasps can be used to secure sliding and in swinging doors.

Hinge hasps were developed to secure hard to lock property including securing two uneven surfaces, around a corner or at angles. The fastener can be two, three or four pieces hinged together with hidden pins and hard metal links. This configuration provides the flexibility between the fastener’s mounting screws and the staple. Hinged hasps are available in varying lengths.

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