Servicing the Buick Enclave, Chevrolet Traverse, GMC Acadia & Saturn Outlook

All four use the GM Z-Keyway system and the “Circle Plus” transponder system. All can be programmed with the standard GM on-board programming procedure, which takes 30 minutes.


All four of these vehicles share the same platform, door construction, steering column, and the same lock system. Three were introduced in the 2007 model year, with the Chevrolet Traverse introduced for the 2009 model year. All four use the GM Z-Keyway system and the “Circle Plus” transponder...


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A single #25 Torx® screw located behind the inside handle can now be removed (Photo 16).
The two screws in the center of the door (Photo 17) are also #25 Torx®. After these three screws have been removed, the only things holding the panel in place are the upholstery clips.
On the underside of the door panel, several cut-outs are located in line with the clips along the bottom edge of the door. A standard clip removal tool can be inserted through the cut-outs to pry the clips free (Photo 18). Once the clips on the bottom of the door are free, work your way around the rest of the panel releasing the clips with your hands rather than by using a tool. This will also help reduce the possibility of scratching the panel in a visible area.

Once the panel is loose, reach between the panel and the inner skin of the door to release the cable that is attached to the inside door handle (Photo 19). Using a pair of needle-nosed pliers, squeeze the two plastic tabs on the cable housing together so that the housing will slip out of the mounting bracket. Then you can rotate the cable around so that it will come free of the handle. When you replace the door panel, you will attach the end of the cable first and then push the cable housing through the opening in the mounting bracket, allowing the two tabs to snap back out to secure the cable.


On the forward edge of the door there are two wiring bundles that connect all of the electronics in the door to the rest of the vehicle. After disconnecting these two connectors, the door panel will be free to come off of the door. Put the panel in a safe place while you do the rest of the job.


Photo 21 shows the back side of the door panel and the two wire connectors that are attached to the wiring in the door panel. The two connectors are slightly different in shape, so you cannot hook the wiring up wrong when you reassemble the door.


With the panel removed, you can see the opening through which you will have to work to access the door lock (Photo 22). The plastic moisture barrier can be peeled completely off if necessary or you can just release the top portion and fold it down.


Inside the door, Photo 23 shows the back of the lock and the lower portion of the clip that holds the lock in the handle. The lock can be removed by working the clip toward the rear of the door and then pushing the lock into the door cavity. As you work with the spring clip, try to push it back just far enough to release the lock, without removing the clip from the handle. If you remove the clip completely, it will be difficult to get it back into place without removing the entire handle assembly. If you can leave the clip in place, after you remove the lock push the clip back into the slot. Then, when you replace the lock, all you will have to do is to slide the lock in until it snaps into place.


After disconnecting the linkage rod, you can now remove the lock from the door for service (Photo 24). The linkage rod is designed to snap in easily to the plastic keeper on the end of the cam, but in order to remove it, you will have to slide the cam up the linkage rod until it comes off over the end of the rod.


In photo 25, you can see one of the ramps that hold the lock in place. As the lock is inserted into the handle assembly, the ramps spread the spring clip apart until it snaps into place at the rear of the ramps. The facecap is reusable; it can be removed with a little careful prying.
The lock cam is held in place on the end of the plug with a standard “E” clip (Photo 26). As you disassemble the lock, mark the position of the cam to make sure that you replace it right side up.


The drain hole, sometimes referred to as the “weep hole” should be positioned on the underside of the lock when it is installed in the vehicle. You can see all seven wafers through the drain hole and it is easy to decode the lock by sight-reading the wafers through the drain hole. But it’s generally easier to decode the lock with the Determinator without having to remove the lock from the door.


After removing the lock cam and the facecap, the plug will slide out of the housing without having to be turned. (Photo 28) These locks are lubricated with a white grease from the factory. If you have to remove the grease while servicing the lock, re-lubricate the lock before you put it back together. Also notice that the shutter assembly is modular and snaps into the face of the lock plug. In most cases it will not be necessary to remove the shutter unless it has been damaged.


Photo 29 shows the wafers out of this particular lock. Each tumbler is stamped with a number that corresponds to the depth of that tumbler, and a letter. All you really need is the number in order to code the cylinder. This vehicle was a rental and may have had a door lock manufactured by someone other than Strattec. The Strattec tumblers are shown in the ignition lock section below.

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