AccuReader: A New Reader Design

AccuReaders are available for GM 8-cut and 10-cut, Ford 8-cut, GM-Z, and Chrysler 8-cut keyways and most motorcycles



The Capeharts have provided a complete solution with each tool, including additional parts where necessary. The Chrysler 8-cut contains one machined key blank, a wafer lifter, and three depth sliders. The GM 10-cut tool includes two key blanks to accommodate the long keyway, and three depth sliders like the Chrysler. By comparison, the GM-Z tool includes six depth slides instead of the basic three, to accommodate warded as well un-warded locks. There is no additional charge for this. The Ford 8-cut contains two key blanks (with differently spaced wafer trapping notches), as well as seven depth slides (two sets), one for non-HUF and one for the HUF lock, all at the price of the basic tool.


Sales are about 50-50 direct vs. distributor generated. LOCKTECH has engaged four distributors so far, H. L. Flake, Lockmasters, H. E. Mitchell and Locksmithtools.com.au. They are seeking additional distributors.


Videos are an important element of LOCKTECH’S on-line presence. Visit www.accureader.com.


Since the product depends on the wafers dropping down (or up) completely (just as with all other readers), wafer free movement is vital. The directions enclosed with the product emphasize the importance of degreasing the wafers to permit free movement.


Some users have been concerned that since AccuReader results depend strictly on the correct position of the wafers, cars with stuck wafers will yield inaccurate results. Keith’s comment is that these users may be working on Fords going back about ten years, which were manufactured with greased locks. Any lock which has grease or accumulated dirt will need to be degreased thoroughly. Running a key in and out of the lock 20 or 30 times while degreasing is recommended. In problem cases a hook pick or similar object may need to be worked in the lock. Keith recommends CRC brand electronic cleaner as a degreaser.


The user should be familiar with progressing. Since sidebar ignition locks cannot be read, door locks will usually be the first choice for cuts. One or two cuts will be unknown, and will have to be progressed. Also, in certain locks, including “HUF” and warded locks, some positions are identified only as one of two possible depths. In those locks where AccuReader yields a choice between two cuts, Keith recommends using the “one-up” progression capabilities of a program like Instacode. The one-up feature combines two searches into one, and yields a progression chart that is simpler and usually more economical of key blanks than two separate searches. With the present AccuReader tools this issue is encountered with Ford 8-cut “HUF” locks at the #4 and #3 wafer positions (they both rest at the same height), and the GM-Z warded locks. These locks are found in about 25 percent of each of these two makes.

Phil Agius, of Framon, which sells Genericode, comments that Genericode at this time cannot accomplish the “one-up” function. However, the possibilities can be separately progressed using Genericode, and the results combined manually. Lacking a progression strategy, the user will need to resort to impressioning in this sub-set of cars.

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