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Steelcraft Doors Obtain Blast-Resistant "No Hazard" Rating Ingersoll Rand Security Technologies today announced compliance with the United States Department of Defense Unified Facilities Criteria - Minimum Antiterrorism Standards for Buildings...


Steelcraft Doors Obtain Blast-Resistant "No Hazard" Rating

Ingersoll Rand Security Technologies today announced compliance with the United States Department of Defense Unified Facilities Criteria - Minimum Antiterrorism Standards for Buildings. Military and government installations, such as housing, hospitals, embassies, office buildings and other facilities can obtain Steelcraft's most popular standard series honeycomb or steel-stiffened core models with multiple glazing and hardware options, with the top blast-resistant rating of "No Hazard." These specifications have been established to provide an enhanced level of protection for personnel from the threat of vehicle-borne explosives.

"Traditionally, door specifiers have been forced to rely on specialty door manufacturers for doors built to withstand any level of blast resistant ratings," reports Matt Guise, Ingersoll Rand Security Technologies category leader, doors, frames and accessories. "Among Steel Door Institute members, Steelcraft has invested in the testing that has led to a rating of 'No Hazard,' the very top blast-resistant rating."

Meeting guidelines as specified under UFC 4-010-01, Steelcraft testing leverages an approved "shock tube" technology that realistically simulates blast impact in a controlled environment. Results of this testing have scientifically demonstrated that the Steelcraft doors met and even exceeded the UFC and ATFP minimum standards for blast-resistant designation.

All such doors are standard series, carry no premium pricing and are available through Steelcraft's Rapid (10 day) program. For more information, visit www.steelcraft.com.

 

Norton SAFEZONE™ Awarded By Architectural Record

SafeZone™, a revolutionary door closer/holder from Norton Door Controls, has been named one of 2010’s “best new products” by Architectural Record.  Every year the publication enlists a panel of experts – lighting designers, architects and product specialists - to select the year’s most exciting, cutting-edge product introductions.  This year SafeZone was one of nine products chosen to represent the category of Windows/Door Hardware/Glazing.

The SafeZone electromechanical closer/holder senses movement in the door opening and holds the door open, allowing passage through any opening far more securely than ever before.  The increased safety makes SafeZone ideal in a wide range of environments, including retirement and rest homes; schools and universities; hospitals and healthcare facilities; auditoriums and performing arts centers; and houses of worship. 

SafeZone features a sensor that can be set to detect movement in one or two directions through the opening - enter only, exit only or enter and exit - unavailable in competitive offerings.  Another unique feature of the SafeZone is that the zone size and sensor direction angle can be increased or decreased, depending on the requirements of the application.  Plus, the multi-point feature means that a door equipped with SafeZone will hold at any degree as long as movement is detected in the opening.

Norton Door Controls is an ASSA ABLOY Group company. For more information, visit www.nortondoorcontrols.com.

 

Morse Watchmans Key Management Meets Ohio University Needs

The scalability of the Morse Watchmans key management solution installed at Ohio University in Athens has enabled security management to add six KeyWatcher cabinets to their system. The expansion allows for all of the key control cabinets to be on the school’s IT network for ease of management, efficiency and security.

"I was comfortable with the user-friendly interface and software of the Morse Watchmans system as well as its reliability," said Matt Smith, access control manager, Ohio University. "It was a definite bonus that we could add on to the existing system without any complications or major alterations."

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